Mumbai’s Tastiest Vegetarian Dishes



If you’re a vegetarian, or you’re interested in just giving the old digestive system a break for a day or two, it is a good idea to pick up a few vegetarian recipe ideas and inspirations. Only a few cities respect the vegetable dish more than the vibrant and colourful Mumbai. This video serves as a friendly guide to any spirited soul who is lucky enough to walk Mumbai’s streets and feels a pang of hunger for some delicious and spicy vegetarian meals.

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It would be an excellent idea to stop for some misal pav next time you are in the Maharashtra capital. Misal is a spicy curry that is commonly made with the moth/mung bean sprouts, a bean that is especially resilient when grown in the harsh Indian heat. Combined in spicy gravy with potatoes, it is topped with farsan or sev, a crunchy chickpea based Indian snack. Served with freshly chopped red onion and lime, the dish is only complete when coupled with sweet and soft pav, the colloquial term for bread in Mumbai. Drop into Mumbai’s Aaswad restaurant for its best variation.

For a simple version of Misal Pav check out this link:

Check out the dish Aaswad’s contact details on the FoodieHub website:

http://www.foodiehub.tv/fast-feasts/asia-pacific/Mumbai/review/Aaswad-Upahar/Misal-Pav/6549_7060

With misal as your delicious appetiser why not get to know more about the Parsi culture by sampling some of their delicious eats. The Parsi people are descendants of a branch of Persians living in India who have utilised strong spices in their curry recipes. Dhansak is the name of their curry that is often made with goat or chicken, but a thick-gravy vegetable dhansak is just as popular. A dhansak curry is reliant on the dhansak masala that is common in northern India, and when combined with root vegetables and lentils, the thick curry can be served on a bed of wild rice or brown rice as a hearty tummy filler. Jimmy Boy restaurant in south Mumbai serves the real deal vegetable dhansak, so make sure you pop in for a taste bud tickle.

Here’s an easy take on a vegetarian dhansak: http://www.vegrecipesofindia.com/veg-dhansak-vegetable-dhansak-recipe/

Check out Jimmy Boy’s FoodieHub review and details here:

http://www.foodiehub.tv/fast-feasts/asia-pacific/Mumbai/review/Jimmy-Boy/Vegetarian-Dhansak/6954_7107

One of the world’s first ancient civilizations was that of the Indus Valley and since then the Rajasthan region in India has been home to many wandering and conquering cultures. From amongst the multitude of differing traditions the kadhi recipe has remained a regional favourite. The thick kadhi gravy has offered the humble Rajasthani a simple relief from the pounding and relentless Indian heat. A kadhi base consists of chickpea flour for consistency and an Indian yoghurt or curd for taste. Flavoured with a compilation of spices the khadi is usually served with khichdi. Khichdi is a staple in many parts of India where rice and lentils are mixed to various consistencies of either a dry bed for gravy or stodgy porridge. The Soam restaurant in Chowpatty, Mumbai serve theirs with a crispy popadum on the side.

For a simple kadhi recipe check here:

Soam’s details and FoodieHub review:

http://www.foodiehub.tv/fast-feasts/asia-pacific/Mumbai/review/Soam-Restaurant/Gujarati-Kadhi-/6955_7108

These are just a few vegetarian recipes that are firm favourites in a beautiful city like that of Mumbai. With Mumbai being the busiest city in India the likes of Aaswad, Jimmy Boy and Soam are surely never short of customers. Mumbai is considered the business capital of India and is also blessed with the country’s highest GDP per capita rate. The city gained importance after English colonisation turned the seven small fishing islands and the natural harbour into the Raj’s largest commercial port (formerly known as Bombay), and the metropolis has never looked back since.

If you’re travelling to Mumbai check out this link:

http://www.lonelyplanet.com/india/mumbai-bombay

Did you know that the famous Indian cricket player Sachin Tendulkar calls Mumbai home? Another famous cricketer Rohit Sharma also comes from the city. Freddie Mercury lived in Mumbai in his teen years while Rudyard Kipling was born in the colony when it was called Bombay.

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